Storm Water

Storm drains flow directly to the ocean, rivers, and lakes without any treatment. Thus, it is important that no one be allowed to dump waste of any kind onto street surfaces, drainage pipes and ditches, or into storm drains. Storm drains are only for rain water.

If you see someone dumping anything onto street surfaces, into storm drains, or into any other device built to contain rainfall or runoff on campus, please report it immediately by calling the Environmental Health and Safety at 619-594-6778 or (after hours) Public Safety 0619-594-1991 with the time, location, and description of the activity.

San Diego State University partners with Think Blue. For more information about how you can protect our waterways, visit Think Blue — City of San Diego Official Website 

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SDSU Stormwater BMP's

Potential Pollutants: Sediment, Trash, Debris, Metals, Bacteria, Oil, Grease, Organics, Dry Weather Flows

Work Practices:

1. Keep outdoor work and storage areas clean and orderly

2. Use dry cleaning methods (e.g., sweeping or vacuuming) to remove all loose debris (e.g., metal or wood shavings), discarded materials, sediment, rags, etc.

3. Use absorbent materials to clean up spilled oil or other liquid chemicals and place used absorbents in a properly labeled container for pick up by EH&S. Call in waste request to (619) 594-6778.

4. Do not store machinery, equipment, or vehicles over storm drains

5. Store equipment with exposed oily/ greasy parts or other potential pollutants (e.g., metals) in a covered area or on pallets or in bins and under plastic sheeting/tarps to prevent contact with rainwater

6. Prevent surface flow from contacting raw materials, equipment, or machinery by storing them on pallets or blocks, or by surrounding the objects with berms

7. Cover/protect storm drain inlets from outdoor work activities as needed

8. Keep outdoor trash cans/bins closed

9. If water is used to clean, do not allow wash water to get into storm drains.

Maintenance: Sweep or vacuum outdoor work and storage areas where pollutants have accumulated weekly during the wet season (October through May). Using street sweeper, clean asphalt covered parking lots and streets weekly

Potential Pollutants of Concern: Hazmat, Trash, Metals, Oil, Grease, Fuel

Work Practices:

1. Keep loading dock areas clean and clean up spills promptly.

2. Train employees on proper spill response procedures.

3. Prevent wash water or other non-storm water discharges from going into storm drains in the loading dock area.

4. Regularly inspect equipment for leaks and place drip pans under leaking equipment.

5. Load/unload only at designated loading areas.

6. Limit the exposure of materials with a potential to contaminate storm water. Store outdoor materials with the potential to contribute pollutants to storm water runoff under cover and off the ground (e.g., on pallets) to prevent exposure to storm water runoff.

7. Do not store dumpsters over storm drains.

8. Avoid loading and unloading during wet weather, whenever possible.

9. Design new loading docks to include a covered and bermed enclosure for trash and recycling dumpsters.

Maintenance:

1. Regularly inspect equipment for leaks and needed repairs. Repair or replace leaking components as needed.

2. Dry sweep the loading dock area regularly.

3. Maintain spill response material (e.g., spill kit) in a location that is easy to access and is known to personnel. Inspect spill kit provisions on a regular basis and replace as needed

4. Schedule trash/recycling collections frequently enough to prevent dumpsters from overfilling.

Potential Pollutants: Trash, Debris, Oil, Grease, Cleaning Agents, Metals, Organics, Sediment, Bacteria

Work Practices:

1. Do NOT discharge any wash water or cleaning products into a storm drain.

2. Cover/protect storm drain inlets from outdoor washing activities as needed.

3. Collect all wash water and discharge to one of the following:

If wash water contains soap but no pollutants, discharge it into the sanitary sewer system (e.g., indoor drain).

If wash water does not contain any cleaning chemicals or other pollutants, it may be discharged to a landscaped area where it can infiltrate if there are no storm drain inlets nearby

4. Perform all equipment washing in areas designed to collect and hold the wash and rinse water generated.

5. Do NOT wash vehicles on-site.

6. Train employees on proper cleaning and wash water disposal procedures, and conduct "refresher" training on a regular basis.

7. Pollutants/debris generated during washing activities must be collected and properly disposed of to avoid potential discharge into a storm drain

8. Use dry cleaning methods (e.g., sweeping or vacuuming) whenever possible

Maintenance:

1. Sweep or vacuum outdoor wash areas where pollutants have accumulated weekly during the wet season (October through May)

2. Inspect wash areas for evidence of discharges into storm drains and if found, contact EH&S: (619) 594-6778.

Potential Pollutants: Oil, Grease, Fuel, Organics

Work Practices:

1. Fueling activities must be overseen by the equipment operator at all times. Do NOT leave fueling operations unattended.

2. During fueling operations, visually monitor the liquid level indicator or equipment to prevent the tank from being overfilled.

3. The maximum amount of product received shall not exceed 95% capacity of the receiving tank.

4. Do not run vehicles, tanker trucks, or equipment during fueling operations.

5. Do not park machinery, equipment, or vehicles over storm drains.

6. Block nearby storm drain inlets with rubber mats or absorbent rolls during large fueling operations.

7. Restrict access to fueling equipment and maintain equipment to prevent leaks

8. Maintain clean fuel-dispensing areas using dry cleanup methods such as sweeping for removal of litter and debris, or use of rags and absorbents for leaks and spills. Do not wash down areas with water. Clean up used absorbent and put it in a container labeled "Used Absorbent" for proper disposal through EH&S.

Maintenance:

1. These procedures must be implemented during all fueling operations

2. Maintain spill response material (e.g., spill kit) in a location that is easy to access and is known to personnel. Inspect spill kit provisions on a regular basis and replace as needed.

3. Repair or replace leaking or damaged fuel-dispensing equipment as needed.

Potential Pollutants: Organics, Metals, Paint, Oil, Grease, Sediment

Work Practices:

1. Conduct equipment, vehicle, and boat maintenance indoors whenever possible.

2. Do not park machinery, equipment, vehicles, or boats over storm drains.

3. Use non-toxic chemicals for maintenance when possible. Choose cleaning agents that can be recycled. Minimize use of solvents. Recycle used oil, diesel oil, and other recyclable materials.

4. Block nearby storm drain inlets with rubber mats or absorbent rolls during fluid transfers and fueling operations.

5. Use drip pans under leaking equipment

6. Keep equipment, boats, and parts with oily components or other pollutant sources that must be stored outside for long periods of time off of the ground (e.g., on a tarp, pallet, blocks, rack, etc) and cover with plastic sheeting or a tarp to avoid contamination of storm water or surface water flow.

7. Properly dispose of or recycle obsolete or inoperable equipment and vehicles. Drain all fluids from equipment and vehicles prior to disposal or recycling.

8. Designate a special area to drain or replace hazardous fluids from equipment and vehicles where there is no connection(s) to the storm drain or sanitary sewer and drips and spills can easily be controlled.

Maintenance:

1. Regularly inspect equipment, vehicles, and boats for leaks. Repair or replace leaking components as needed.

2. Maintain spill response material (e.g., spill kit) in a location that is easy to access and is known to personnel. Inspect spill kit provisions on a regular basis and replace as needed

Potential Pollutants: Litter, Debris, Oil, Grease, Bacteria

Work Practices:

1. Keep outdoor trash and recycling dumpsters closed.

2. Empty outdoor trash and recycling bins/cans frequently to prevent spillage.

3. Place trash and recycling receptacles in appropriate locations. Do NOT store receptacles over storm drain inlets.

4. Label recycling and trash receptacles to ensure appropriate materials are placed in appropriate containers.

5. Contain food and animal wastes in tied plastic bags or closable containers.

6. Clean receptacles as needed and keep areas around receptacles clean and orderly.

7. Use absorbent materials to clean up any spilled liquid garbage waste (e.g., grease or cooking oil) and dispose of used absorbent in the trash.

8. Use "dry" cleaning methods (e.g., sweep or vacuum) whenever feasible.

9. Do NOT dispose of any hazardous waste in a trash receptacle!

Maintenance:

1. Inspect trash receptacles and storage areas regularly to confirm they are not leaking, overfilled, or spilling and increase pick-up schedule if needed. Keep storage areas clean and lids closed.

2. Repair or replace leaking or damaged receptacles as needed.

Potential Pollutants: Organics, Metals, Oil, Grease, Trash

Work Practices:

1. Label all containers of hazardous waste with a hazardous waste label including:

• Contents, composition, and physical state of the waste

• Hazardous properties of the waste

• Accumulation start date (the date the waste is first placed in the container)

• Name of the hazardous waste generator

2. Hazardous waste containers must be in good condition and not leaking.

3. Containers must be kept closed except when adding or removing hazardous waste.

4. Store hazardous wastes in areas not susceptible to rain, and provide secondary containment in case of leaks or spills.

5. Locate hazardous waste storage and handling areas away from storm drains and waterways (e.g., concrete culverts).

6. Do NOT store more than 55-gallons of any hazardous waste or 1 quart of extremely hazardous waste.

7. The storage of toxic, corrosive, reactive, or ignitable wastes shall comply with local and state fire codes.

8. Paved storage areas shall be maintained in impervious condition. Cracks and gaps will be covered to maintain the integrity of the secondary containment

9. Keep hazardous waste storage areas clean.

10. Ensure each container is compatible with its contents (e.g., a corrosive waste such as acid should be stored in a plastic container not metal).

11. Mixed wastes within a container shall be compatible with each other.

12. Incompatible hazardous wastes must be separated by a dike, berm, wall, or secondary containment device.

13. Store and maintain appropriate spill cleanup materials in a location known to all personnel and near the waste storage areas.

Maintenance:

1. Inspect hazardous waste storage areas and containers on a weekly basis to ensure the containers are properly labeled, closed, and secure and are not leaking or deteriorated. Replace leaking or damaged containers or secondary containment as needed.

2. Inspect spill cleanup materials on a regular basis and replace supplies as needed.

Potential Pollutants: Organics, Trash, Debris, Oil and Grease, Metals

Work Practices:

1. Review Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) for details regarding labeling, storage, handling, cleanup, and disposal of hazardous materials.

2. Prior to transport, containers must be properly labeled and secured. Check caps, lids, bungs, etc., to make sure containers are closed and leak proof.

3. Materials being transported on the same pallet should be compatible with one another.

4. Keep loads to a reasonable size during transportation.

5. Provide some form of secondary containment during transport whenever possible (e.g., secondary containment pallets) to prevent a spill from reaching the ground.

6. Do NOT place material or waste containers directly on the ground (e.g., place containers on containment pallets)

7. Do NOT leave materials or wastes unattended during transport

8. Store and maintain appropriate spill cleanup materials in a location known to all personnel (near storage and maintenance areas).

9. Secure drums transported with a forklift in a "trap" to prevent the drum from falling off

10. Avoid transporting materials or wastes during wet weather if possible

Maintenance:

1. Maintain MSDSs and records of materials and wastes transported onsite

2. Inspect spill response provisions on a regular basis and replace as needed

Potential Pollutants: Trash, Debris, Oil, Grease, Bacteria, Cleaning agents, Dry weather flows

Work Practices:

1. Do NOT dispose of grease or cooking oil to any storm drain or sanitary sewer system drain! Waste grease and cooking oil must be collected in labeled containers/bins and stored for pick-up and disposal by an appropriate vendor/contractor.

2. Collect grease and used cooking oil in labeled containers that that can be securely closed.

3. Keep containers closed except when adding grease or cooking oil to prevent spillage. Do not store containers near a storm drain. Provide secondary containment (e.g., berms) and a cover for all outdoor waste containers to prevent them from coming into contact with rain water or surface water flows.

4. Keep outdoor trash dumpsters closed. Do not dispose of liquid wastes in trash receptacles.

5. Keep waste collection areas clean and orderly. Use "dry" cleaning methods (e.g., absorbents and sweeping or vacuuming) to clean spills whenever feasible.

6. If water is used to clean equipment or areas outside, do not allow wash water to get into storm drains.

7. Do NOT dispose of ice to storm water drains. Ice may be disposed of in a landscaped area where the water can infiltrate into the ground such as a lawn or dirt area with plants.

8. Store and maintain appropriate spill cleanup materials in a location known to all personnel

Maintenance:

1. Inspect grease storage areas and outdoor trash receptacles and compactors on a daily basis for leaking containers. Repair or replace leaking waste receptacles as needed.

2. Inspect grease interceptors weekly. Schedule regular cleaning of grease interceptors to prevent clogging or overflowing. Schedule regular pickups for the grease containers to ensure there is sufficient capacity available.

3. Inspect outdoor storm drains for evidence of improper disposal of grease, cooking oil, or other food waste. If found, contact EH&S at (619) 594-6778.

4. Inspect spill kit provisions regularly and replenish as needed.

Potential Pollutants: Bacteria, Dry Weather Flows

Work Practices:

Do NOT dispose of any of the following into the sanitary sewer system:

1. Concentrated chemicals with a pH less than 5 or greater than 12.5.

2. Substances that may obstruct flow like greases and oils

3. Hazardous substances or waste

4. Heated waste streams equal to or greater than 150 ‘ F

Response Procedures:

1. Try to stop or control the release at the source

2. Block nearby storm drains

3. Call a vactor truck company for assistance to collect the overflow if release cannot be quickly stopped or contained

4. Notify EHS immediately: (619)594-6778

Maintenance:

1. Maintain sanitary sewer system to prevent blockages and/or overflows in accordance with SDSU’s Sanitary Sewer Management Plan

2. Inspect spill kit provisions on a regular basis and replace as needed.

Potential Pollutants: Sediment, Trash, Debris, Metals, Bacteria, Fertilizer, Pesticides

Work Practices:

1. Monitor irrigation system to prevent non-storm water discharges. DO NOT over-irrigate. Reduce run times to prevent runoff if needed.

2. Repair leaks in the irrigation system as soon as they are reported.

3. Use erosion control measures on exposed soils such as: hydraulic, straw, or wood mulch; hydro seeding; soil binders; and rolled erosion control products.

4. Berm and cover stockpiled materials (e.g., dirt from trenching activities). Place stockpiled material away from storm water conveyance system inlets.

5. DO NOT dispose of collected vegetation into the storm water conveyance system.

6. Safety data sheets (SDS) are to be followed for details regarding labeling, storage, handling, disposal, and cleanup of fertilizers and pesticides.

7. DO NOT apply fertilizers or pesticides prior to expected rain or in high winds and minimize off-target application (overspray).

8. Use hand or mechanical weeding methods where practical.

9. Use non toxic pesticides.

Maintenance:

1. Inspect and clean out storm water conveyance system before the start of the wet season (October 1st). Document inspections and resultant activities.

2. Monitor irrigation system at least once during the dry season (May – September) for discharges into the storm water conveyance system. Adjust irrigation system as needed. Document inspection.

3. Monitor areas prone to erosion at least once during the wet season and mitigate as necessary. Document inspection.

4. Regularly inspect landscaping equipment for leaks and repair as needed.

Potential Pollutants: Sediment, Trash, Metals, Bacteria, Oil, Grease, Organics, Dry weather flows

Work Practices:

1. Clean up as much as possible using dry cleaning methods (e.g., sweeping or vacuuming) before washing.

2. Do NOT discharge any wash water or cleaning products into a storm drain.

3. Identify nearby storm drains and protect them from wash water.

a. Use sand bags or a portable berm to block off storm drain

b. Temporarily plug storm drains in vicinity using specially designed mats or by covering with a weighed down plastic liner

4. Contain and collect wash water

a. Use a wet/dry vacuum to collect the wash water

b. If very little wash water is generated, use a mop

5. Dispose of wash water appropriately

a. Landscaped area (when wash water contains no cleaning chemicals)

b. Sanitary sewer (when wash water contains cleaning chemicals)

6. Pollutants generated during washing activities (e.g., paint or metal chips, oil & grease, sediment, trash/debris, food waste) must be collected and properly disposed of to avoid potential discharge into a storm drain.

7. During cleaning activities, ensure that the measures taken to contain the water are working adequately.

8. Surface cleaning should not occur during rain events

9. Train employees on proper surface cleaning and wash water disposal procedures, and conduct "refresher" training on a regular basis.

Maintenance:

1. Sweep or vacuum high pollutant load areas prior to any washing activities.

2. Notify EH&S of any discharges of wash water into storm drains by calling: (619)594-6778

3. Sweep all asphalt covered parking lots and streets weekly with the street sweeper during the wet season. Establish frequency of parking lot sweeping during the dry season based on usage and field observations of waste accumulation.

Potential Pollutants: Organics, Metals, Paint, Sediment, Oil, Grease, Trash, Debris

Work Practices:

1. Place tarps/plastic sheeting under objects prior to painting, scraping, or sandblasting to contain and collect paint and particulate waste.

2. Prior to spray painting or sandblasting, shroud work area with plastic sheeting or plywood to contain airborne overspray or dust/particulates. During these activities, inspect the containment measures to ensure they are working.

3. Protect nearby storm drains from activities with rubber mats, filter fabric, or by covering with a weighed down plastic liner

4. Only minor touch up painting or architectural coating (e.g., painting a stationary structure) may be performed. All other painting must be performed either at the campus paint shop or by a vendor in accordance with Air Pollution Control District regulations.

5. Sweep, vacuum, shovel, and if necessary, use absorbent materials to collect particulate wastes or paint not contained on tarps.

6. Pollutants/debris generated by activities such as paint or metal chips, sediment/particulates, trash/debris must be collected and properly disposed of to avoid potential discharge into a storm drain.

7. Collect and contain rinse water from ALL painting activities (including water based paint) for disposal through EH&S (619)594-6778

8. Avoid sanding or painting in windy weather.

Potential Pollutants: Pesticides, Dry weather flows

Work Practices:

1. Keep outdoor storage areas clean and orderly.

2. Eliminate pest attractants such as food, water, debris, shelter and infested plant material.

3. Frequently remove weeds from plant beds that may become invasive or attract unwanted pests.

4. Maintain irrigation systems to eliminate irrigation runoff, possible water sources for pests and breeding sites for insects.

5. Use proper fertilizing, sanitation and watering techniques to maintain plant health.

6. Utilize pest resistant plants to eliminate the necessity for chemical based pesticides.

7. Create physical barriers around plant beds to limit the access of rodents and other pests.

8. Use mechanical elements, such as soil solarization, heat treatments, or traps to prevent pests from propagating.

9. Strategically cultivate plant species that will attract competitive organisms in order to reduce the survival potential and expansion of a particular pest species.

10. Cultivate plant species that are drought tolerant to reduce the amount of irrigation required and potential runoff.

11. Use organic materials and mulch to control irrigation runoff and reduce the need for chemical controls.

12. Use the least toxic, most effective and pest specific pesticides when necessary.

13. Empty trash receptacles frequently, clean dishes immediately after use, reduce clutter, seal areas where pests may enter buildings, and keep premises free of trash and overgrown vegetation in order to reduce the possibility of attracting indoor pests.

Maintenance:

1. Monitor irrigation system at least once during the dry season (May – September) for discharges into the storm water conveyance system. Adjust irrigation system as needed.

2. Regularly inspect grounds and landscaping for evidence of pests.

3. Visually inspect for trash and remove as needed.

Potential Pollutants: Dry Weather Flows, Hazardous Materials, Oil, Grease, Trash, Debris

Work Practices:

1. Recycle residual paints, solvents, lumber and other material as much as possible.

2. Do NOT dump waste on the pavement, the ground, or toward a storm drain. Do not discharge non-rain water into a storm drain.

3. Use ground or drop cloths underneath outdoor painting, scraping, and sandblasting work, and properly dispose of collected material daily.

4. Paint brushes and tools covered with water-based paints should be rinsed twice and the rinse water collected in buckets and managed as hazardous waste. Subsequent rinses must be into a sink or drain that goes to the sanitary sewer. Brushes and tools covered with non-water-based paints, finishes, or other materials must be cleaned in a manner that enables collection of used solvents (e.g., paint thinner, turpentine, etc.) for recycling or proper disposal as hazardous waste.

5. Use a storm drain cover, filtering fabric, or similarly effective runoff control mechanism if dust, grit, wash water, or other pollutants may escape the work area and enter a catch basin. The containment device(s) must be in place at the beginning of the work day, and accumulated dirty runoff and solids must be collected and disposed of before removing the containment device(s) at the end of the work day.

6. When de-watering of an excavation site, water is filtered using filter fabric or other sediment filters/traps before discharging to a catch basin or off-site.

7. Keep hazardous materials containers closed and stored under cover (e.g., tarps or other temporary cover material) with secondary containment during precipitation events and when not in use.

8. Keep dirt/soil stockpiles covered during rain or high wind conditions.

9. Clean up spills promptly.

Maintenance:

1. Inspect the project site daily and keep project area clean, free of trash/litter and loose materials that may be blown offsite or that might get into a storm drain during a rain event.

Potential Pollutants: Organics, Metals, Paint, Sediment, Oil, Grease, Trash, Debris

Work Practices:

1. Keep parking lots and storage areas clean and orderly. Remove debris in a timely fashion.

2. Provide an adequate number of litter receptacles.

3. Empty and cover litter receptacles frequently to prevent spillage.

4. Use dry cleaning methods to prevent the discharge of pollutants into the storm water conveyance system.

5. Using the street sweeper, clean parking lots once a week.

6. If surfaces must be repaved, block off storm drains to prevent contamination of the storm water conveyance system.

7. Inspect parking lots, storage areas, and cleaning equipment for leaks regularly.

8. When designing new parking lots, install treatment controls (e.g., bio-retention swales, pervious parking spaces, etc.) to collect and treat storm water runoff.

9. Maintain treatment controls that are installed to treat sheet runoff in accordance with their design standards and operation and maintenance recommendations.

Maintenance:

1. Parking lots and storage areas should be cleaned on a regular basis, during routine maintenance rounds, to prevent accumulated wastes and pollutants from being discharged into conveyance systems.

2. Storm water treatment controls in parking lots should be maintained on an as needed basis and following heavy rain events.

 

Potential Pollutants: Dry Weather Flows, Bacteria, Residual Chlorine, Ethylene Glycol

Work Practices:

1. Do NOT discharge water from safety showers, boiler drain lines, condensate drain lines, rooftop HVAC equipment, or drainage sumps into a storm drain or onto an area that will discharge into a storm drain.

2. Collect water from eyewash shower testing and deposit in a vegetated area away from storm drains.

3. Cover/protect nearby storm drain inlets from outdoor work activities as needed.

4. Collect water from equipment into a portable tank, a tanker truck, or wet/dry shop vacuum (collection tank capacity must be greater than the volume of water being flushed/discharged) and:

a. For large volumes, water must be disposed of to the sanitary sewer system. Discharge must not exceed 35 gallons per minute and/or 6,500 gallons per day.

b. For small volumes (less than 25 gallons), discharge to the sanitary sewer system or, if the water is clean and does not contain any chemicals, to a pervious vegetated area where the water can infiltrate into the ground if it will not reach a storm drain or cause erosion and the water does not contain any chemical additives or cleaning products. Cover/protect nearby storm drain inlets as needed.

5. If chemicals are drained from equipment (e.g., ethylene glycol), collect and properly recycle or dispose of as a hazardous waste.

6. If water is used to clean, do not allow wash water to get into storm drains.

7. Keep areas around outdoor safety showers clean of bird droppings and sediment.

Maintenance:

1. Notify EH&S of any observed discharges of water from emergency eyewash/showers, boilers, condensate drain lines, rooftop HVAC equipment, and drainage sumps into storm drain inlets by calling (619)594-6778

 

Potential Pollutants: Dry Weather Flows, Residual Chlorine

Work Practices:

1. Do NOT discharge water from potable water system flushing/testing or new line chlorination into a storm drain or onto an area that will discharge into a storm drain.

2. Cover/protect nearby storm drain inlets from outdoor work activities as needed.

3. System Flushing:

a. Before beginning the flush, collect any chemicals from the system (e.g., propylene glycol, inhibitors, etc.) into drums for proper disposal as hazardous waste.

b. Collect water and detergent from flushing activities into a portable tank or a tanker truck (collection tank capacity must be greater than the volume of water being flushed/ discharged) and dispose of to the sanitary sewer system. Discharge must not exceed 35 gallons per minute and/or 6,500 gallons per day.

4. Chlorination of New Water Lines:

Collect chlorinated water and de-chlorinate prior to discharge to the sanitary sewer system. Discharge must not exceed 35 gallons per minute and/or 6,500 gallons per day.

Maintenance:

1. Notify EH&S of any observed discharges of water from water lines into storm drain (619)594-6778.

 

Potential Pollutants: Residual Chlorine

Work Practices:

1. Pool water may be discharged into the storm drain if the pH is neutral and chlorine levels are non-detect. If discharged to sewer system, discharge rate to sewer must not exceed 50 gallons per minute.

 

 

Water Pollution Control Plan (WPCP)